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Volume 53 Number 1, September 2001

Volume 53 Number 1

New Research at Vijayanagara

From the General Editor’s Desk

Architecture and Royal Authority under the Early Sangamas
Phillip B. Wagoner

The Temple District of Vitthalapura
Alexandra Mack

Memorial Stones
Anila Verghese

Revisting Narnaul’s Architectural Legacy
Jyoti and Janhwij Sharma

The Portrait of Kunga Gyaltsenpel Sanpo
E.V. Ganevskaya, E.D. Ogneva, and A.F. Dubrovin

Newsletters

Book Reviews

From the General Editor's Desk
Pal, Pratapaditya
Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001, pp. 10-11
Marg's general editor, Pratapaditya Pal, criticises the superficial renaming of Indian cities (such as changing Calcutta to Kolkata) and the new governmental policy of making the teaching of Sanskrit compulsory across schools.
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Architecture and Royal Authority under the Early Sangamas
Wagoner, Phillip B.
Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001, pp. 12-23 [Also in New Light on Hampi: Recent Research at Vijayanagara edited by John M. Fritz and George Michell; Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001; ISBN: 81-85026-53-X, pp. 12-23]

Vijayanagara's first dynasty, the Sangamas, creatively employed architecture and urban planning to transform a regional pilgrimage centre (tirtha) into their imperial capital. Before the rise of the Sangamas in the early 14th century, the Hampi site had long been famous as a tirtha devoted to the worship of the river goddess Pampa and her consort Virupaksha, a local form of Shiva. To bolster their royal authority, the Sangamas elevated Virupaksha to the position of state deity; and presented themselves as his viceroys. This article examines their use of architecture and urban planning to achieve this end.

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The Temple District of Vitthalapura
Mack, Alexandra
Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001, pp. 24-39 [Also in New Light on Hampi: Recent Research at Vijayanagara edited by John M. Fritz and George Michell; Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001; ISBN: 81-85026-53-X, pp. 24-39]

While the city of Vijayanagara was more than the sum of its parts, many of the individual districts within the urban area were distinct entities. The district of Vitthalapuram was the largest of the temple districts and is noted for the range of temples found within its boundaries. In addition to its unique array of religious buildings, archaeological remains reveal a broad range of both religious and secular activities.

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Memorial Stones
Verghese, Anila
Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001, pp. 40-49 [Also in New Light on Hampi: Recent Research at Vijayanagara edited by John M. Fritz and George Michell; Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001; ISBN: 81-85026-53-X, pp. 40-49]

This paper on memorial stones at Hampi deals with the variety of such stones found at the site, describing their location as well as the significance of such sculptures. The memorials include the satikals or sati-stones, the sati-virakals or sati cum hero stones, the virakals or hero-stones, as well as the suicide memorials. A brief account is also given of a group of pre-Vijayanagara memorial stones located at Kummata, a site near Hampi, which is of interest not only because of the high artistic quality of these memorials but also because many of them commemorate known historical personages.

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Revisiting Narnaul's Architectural Legacy
Sharma, Jyoti and Janhwij
Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001, pp. 50-61

One of the many urban centres of Sultanate and Mughal India whose patrons bequeathed it an architectural legacy is Narnaul in Haryana. Prominent typologies seen here are havelis, tombs, and pleasure retreats. Unlike Delhi, Agra, and Jaipur near which it is situated, the built heritage of Narnaul suffers from obscurity, and scholarly and physical neglect.

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The Portrait of Kunga Gyaltsenpel Sanpo
Ganevskaya, E.V. and Ogneva, E.D. and Dubrovin, A.F.
Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001, pp. 62-67
The article deals with the metal sculpture of a Tibetan monk from the Oriental Art Museum, Moscow. The authors analyse the votive inscription on the pedestal and the texts on the paper scrolls taken out of the sculpture’s reliquary. This data together with analyses of the style and content of alloy of the image gave ground to identify the master Sonam Tashi (mentioned in the inscription) as the abbot of Sakya monastery (died 1417) and the depicted person as Kunga Gyaltsenpel Sanpo, Sakya hierarch (1310–58) with the tile “dishri” (emperor’s teacher). They also suggest the reconstruction of the name of the abbot of Thel monastery (mentioned in the inscription as the consecrator of the sculpture), Kunga Gyalva.
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Newsletter from New Delhi
Singh, Kavita
Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001, pp. 68-70

Kavita Singh reports on the exhibitions Unbuilt India curated by Gautam Bhatia at the Vis-a-Vis Design Centre, Kitsch Kitsch Hota Hai at Gallery Espace and The Gold and the Clay showcasing works by Italian designer Tarshito at the Crafts Museum.

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Newsletter from Mumbai
Ahmed, Monisha
Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001, pp. 71-74

Monisha Ahmed reports on the restoration by INTACH of the Corporation Hall of the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) building after a fire broke out there in 2000.

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Note from Bhubaneshwar
Rath, Biswajeet
Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001, p. 75

Biswajeet Rath reports on new excavations in the Langudi, Deulia, Bipagiri, Kayana, Tarapura, Neuliapura, and Kantigudia hills of Orissa.

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Newsletter from London
Siudmak, John
Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001, pp. 76-77

John Siudmak reports on the exhibition Treasury of the World: Jewelled Arts of India in the Age of the Mughals at the British Museum.

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Newsletter from the USA
Safrani, Shehbaz H.
Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001, pp. 78-80

Shehbaz H. Safrani reports on the show Intimate Worlds: Indian Paintings from the Alvin 0 . Bellak Collection at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

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Review Article: Transmissions and Transformations: Art From Two Little-known Southeast Asian Kingdoms
Pal, Pratapaditya
Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001, pp. 81-84

Burma's Lost Kingdoms: Splendours of Arakan by Pamela Gutman and Cham Art: Treasures from the Da Nang Museum, Vietnam by Emmanuel Guillon reviewed by Pratapaditya Pal.

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Book Reviews: Feet and Footwear in Indian Culture by Jutta Jain-Neubauer
Singh, Kavita
Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001, pp. 85-86

This book, sponsored by the Bata Shoe Museum in Toronto, has been reviewed by Kavita Singh.

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Book Reviews: Imaging Sound by Bonnie C. Wade
Masselos, Jim
Vol. 53 No. 1, September 2001, pp. 87-88

This book has been reviewed by Jim Masselos.

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