Look Inside

Volume 52 Number 1, September 2000

Volume 52 Number 1

Contemporary Indian Sculpture

From the General Editor’s Desk

Sculptural Embodiments: Unmaking and Remaking Modernity
Anshuman Das Gupta

Towards a “Genre” Theory of Figurative Sculpture
Benoy  P.J.

Abstraction: Nature and the Numinous
Suresh Jayaram

Shifts in Medium: Trends, Tendencies, and Breakthroughs
Sudhir Kumar Duppati

Deorkothar Stupa: New Light in Early Buddhism
Phani Kanta Mishra

Newsletters

Book Feature

Book Reviews

From the General Editor's Desk
Pal, Pratapaditya
Vol. 52 No. 1, September 2000, pp. 10-11
Museums in India, with few exceptions, are still at a stage where most museums in the developed world were at the turn of the 20th century. Simple requirements such as attractive display, educational programmes, museum shops, marketing, and merchandising can help museums raise funds, and seeking private funding sources can equip museums with improved galleries and programmes.
BUY PDF:   75 (INR) / $ 2 (USD)
Sculptural Embodiments: Unmaking and Remaking Modernity
Benoy, P. J.
Vol. 52 No. 1, September 2000, pp. 12-24 [Also in Twentieth-century Indian Sculpture: The Last Two Decades edited by Shivaji K. Panikkar; Vol. 52 No. 1, September 2000; ISBN: 81-85026-49-1, pp. 13-24]
A new horizon of thoughts and practices seems to embody and displace the given set of models of both traditions and modernities. The last two decades surge towards the expanded field where every category of the previous decades went through changes. Thus newer models and newer codes have energized, displaced, and evinced newer modes of identities and alterity.
BUY PDF:   75 (INR) / $ 2 (USD)
Towards a "Genre" Theory of Figurative Sculpture
Benoy, P. J.
Vol. 52 No. 1, September 2000, pp. 25-39 [Also in Twentieth-century Indian Sculpture: The Last Two Decades edited by Shivaji K. Panikkar; Vol. 52 No. 1, September 2000; ISBN: 81-85026-49-1, pp. 25-39]
Figuration has remained central to sculptural practices in India. But it has undergone considerable evolution in the last 4 decades. Using genre theories to look at Indian figurative sculpture of the 1980s and '90s, the works of several artists are discussed in the context of the concerns that bear on their work and the materials used. Using theories to categorize art helps to establish possible connections and distinctions which make an appraisal of art less complex and more manageable. Thus the genres discussed are: Neo-Classicism; Avant-Garde; Primitivism/Expressionism; Real and Surreal; Folk, Pop, and Performative.
BUY PDF:   75 (INR) / $ 2 (USD)
Abstraction: Nature and the Numinous
Jayaram, Suresh
Vol. 52 No. 1, September 2000, pp. 40-51 [Also in Twentieth-century Indian Sculpture: The Last Two Decades edited by Shivaji K. Panikkar; Vol. 52 No. 1, September 2000; ISBN: 81-85026-49-1, pp. 40-51]
Abstract sculpture in the 1980s and '90s displays no overriding national trends but is determined by conscious individual choices. This essay traces the major contributions of younger contemporaries and views some of the significant trajectories that use the language of abstraction.
BUY PDF:   75 (INR) / $ 2 (USD)
Shifts in Medium: Trends, Tendencies, and Breakthroughs
Duppati, Sudhir Kumar
Vol. 52 No. 1, September 2000, pp. 52-63 [Also in Twentieth-century Indian Sculpture: The Last Two Decades edited by Shivaji K. Panikkar; Vol. 52 No. 1, September 2000; ISBN: 81-85026-49-1, pp. 52-63]
An unsolicited laudatory letter from Nobel laureate Professor Amartya Sen on the quality of the Marg's publications prompts the hope that like-minded people around the globe will persuade others to subscribe to Marg, for ultimately it is economics which determines the quality of publication. Marg, the oldest and only serious journal of its kind in India devoted to the arts which receives no endowment is dependent on sales to sustain its quality.
BUY PDF:   75 (INR) / $ 2 (USD)
Deorkothar Stupa: New Light in Early Buddhism
Mishra, Phani Kanta
Vol. 52 No. 1, September 2000, pp. 64-74
The monastic nucleus in Rewa district, M.P, was recently excavated. It had been believed that there was no human settlement here before Gupta times; but its location along the Barhat-Sarnath-Kausambi triangle, a much used route in Ashokan times with the Tomas flowing below led this author to look for evidence of habitation here. Besides the Great Stupa, the author reports on the recently-completed excavation yields: stupas, rock shelters, a Mauryan pillar piece with Brahmi script, and the earliest attempt to portray art forms on stone railings. The last period of activity here was in Sunga times - 2nd century BCE.
BUY PDF:   75 (INR) / $ 2 (USD)
Newsletters
Vol. 52 No. 1, September 2000, pp. 75–83
Summer being slow season for Delhi's art world, Kavita Singh writes about permanent features of the city's art landscape, including American Institute for Indian Studies, the Archives and Research Centre for Ethnomusicology, and IGNCA; Monisha Ahmed reports on the second Karl Khandalavala lecture 'Ravi Varma - His Life and Paintings' delivered by Dr Saryu Doshi, and on an exhibition featuring the works of L.N. Tallur and Anju Dodiya, both nominated to represent India at the 'Art in the World 2000' exhibition in Paris; London-based John Siudmak discusses the events of the Ancient India and Iran Trust, an exhibition of lacquer work from Burma, and an exhibition of Jain art in Antwerp.
BUY PDF:   75 (INR) / $ 2 (USD)
Book Feature
Vol. 52 No. 1, September 2000, pp. 84-87

Pratapaditya Pal writes about Paintings from India: The Nasser D. Khalili Collection of Islamic Art, Vol. VIII by Linda York Leach. This is the eighth in a series of twenty-seven volumes devoted to what is generally known as the Khalili Collection.

BUY PDF:   75 (INR) / $ 2 (USD)
Book Reviews
Vol. 52 No. 1, September 2000, pp. 88-92

Image and Identity: Fifty Years of Painting and Sculpture in Pakistan by Akbar Naqvi, reviewed by Ratan Parimoo; Temple Architecture and Sculpture of the Nolambas (Ninth-Tenth Centuries) by Andrew L. Cohen, reviewed by Anila Verghese.

BUY PDF:   75 (INR) / $ 2 (USD)