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Volume 27 Number 1, December 1973

Volume 27 Number 1

Cambodia

A Forgotten Culture (Editorial)

The Mask and the Smile: Portfolio Chronology

The Glory that was Angkor
T. Narayanan

Civilisation and Culture in the Mekong Valley
T. Narayanan

The Thirteen Styles
T. Narayanan

Sambor, Prei Khmeng, Kompong Preah, Kulen, Preah Koh, Bakong, Phnom Bakheng, Koh Ker, Banteay Srei, Kleang, Baphuon, Angkor Wat, Bayon

Bibliography

A Forgotten Culture [Editorial]
Anand, Mulk Raj
Vol. 27 No. 1, December 1973, pp. 2–4

This special issue presents the first analytical treatment of the art of Angkor, which was inspired by the Hindu and Buddhist art of India. The Angkor complex were discovered, described, analysed, and renovated by the Khmer people, under the advice of the Ecole de Extreme Orient of France.

The Mask and the Smile; Chronology
Vol. 27 No. 1, December 1973, pp. 5–15

Photographs of Khmer sculptures depicting Bodhisattvas, ordinary mortals, and the smile of Buddha recreated by the carvers of Angkor.

The Glory that was Angkor: Historical Background
Narayanan, T.
Vol. 27 No. 1, December 1973, pp. 16-53

"Angkor", derived from the Sanskrit "Nagara", is a vast complex of ruined temples in Cambodia. It represents a fusion of Indian and Southeast Asian indigenous culture. The article discusses the antecedents which produced the Angkor culture, and the development of Cambodian architecture under Jayavarman II (802) and his successors.

Historical Background
Vol. 27 No. 1, December 1973, pp. 16-22

The article discusses the antecedents which produced the Angkor culture, and the development of Cambodian architecture under Jayavarman II and his successors.

Civilisation and Culture in the Mekong Valley
Narayanan, T.
Vol. 27 No. 1, December 1973, pp. 23-25

The Khmer civilization began in the first century CE in the delta of the Mekong river, Cambodia. The architectural patterns developed through the Funan (1st-6th centuries), Chen-la (7th century to 1st half of 9th century), and Angkor (2nd half of 9th century to 13th century) periods.

The Thirteen Styles
Narayanan, T.
Vol. 27 No. 1, December 1973, pp. 26-53

The sculptural and architectural remains - temples, towns, stone images - represent 13 different styles at the sites datable to these historical phases: Sambor, Prei-Khmeng, Kampong Preah, Kulen, Preah Koh, Bakong, Phnom Bakheng, Koh Ker, Banteay Srei, Kleang, Baphuan, Angkor Vat, and Bayon.