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Volume 23 Number 3, June 1970

Volume 23 Number 3

Hymn to Mahabalipuram

Hymn to Mahabalipuram (Editorial)

The Ballad and the Source
Mulk Raj Anand

The Legend of Arjuna’s Penance
Mulk Raj Anand

The Vision of the Rock and the Plastic Situation of the Panels
Mulk Raj Anand

Mamallapuram:
T.N. Ramchandran

1. Mamallapuram Pallava Rock-Cut Architecture

2. Kiratarjuniyam or Arjuna’s Penance

Hymn to Mahabalipuram [Editorial]
Anand, Mulk Raj
Vol. 23 No. 3, June 1970, pp. 2-3

The Mahabalipuram rock with the carving of Arjuna's Penance is one of the great masterpieces of world art. It is remarkable not only for its impressive size, but also for the near-perfect symbolic reproduction of Bharavi's Kiratarjuniyam fable.

The Ballad and the Source
Anand, Mulk Raj
Vol. 23 No. 3, June 1970, pp. 4-9

Presents the circumstances leading to the conception of the Kiratarjuniyam (Arjuna's Penance) scene on the Mahabalipuram rock, and also describes its execution by the sculptors, as directed by the Pallava king, Mahendravarman.

The Legend of Arjuna's Penance
Anand, Mulk Raj
Vol. 23 No. 3, June 1970, pp. 10-13

The legend of Arjuna's penance - as narrated in the Mahabharata – is recounted and then the treatment of the subject in Bharavi's Kiratarjuniyam is explained.

The Vision of the Rock and the Plastic Situation of the Panels
Anand, Mulk Raj
Vol. 23 No. 3, June 1970, pp. 14-22

Recounts the fable of Mahabalipuram, with photographs from the great rock depicting Arjuna's Penance.

Mamallapuram
Ramchandran, T.N.
Vol. 23 No. 3, June 1970, pp. 23-52

Mamallapuram, 35 miles from Madras, was the seaport of the Pallavas (3rd-8th centuries). The monuments are in the Pallava style, and consist of cut-out monoliths (most of which are called rathas), cut-in caves (sometimes called mandapas), and temples. The Mamallapuram king Mahendravarman I (580-630) initiated the use of hard rock in the south, inspired by the megalithic monuments. The most significant of the sculptural scenes and reliefs carved on the hill edges of Mamallapuram is the Kiratarjuniyam (early 7th century). Besides the main theme, the sculpture also presents a web of other stories and side-stories. The article studies this bas-relief in the light of the Mahabharata, and gives details of the carving method, influences, content, and intent or purpose behind the sculptures.