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Volume 23 Number 1, December 1969

Volume 23 Number 1

Terracottas

Clay in the Hands of Man (Editorial)

Beauties Born in the Mud of the Potter’s Yard: Notes on Old Terracottas
Mulk Raj Anand

Portfolio: From Pictures and Notes of
Ananda Coomaraswamy, K.P. Jayaswal, Stella Kramrisch, S.K. Saraswati, Mulk Raj Anand, D.P. Ghosh, R.C. Agrawala, S.P. Srivastava, and R. Das Gupta

The Terracotta Art of India
H.D. Sankalia and M.K. Dhavalikar

Supplement

Supplement
Vol. 23 No. 1, December 1969, pp. 3-16 [Supplement to Vol. 23 No. 1]

John Irwin writes about a bronze cire-perdue image of Hanuman gifted to the South Kensington Museum by William Morris in 1869. The image is possibly from Ceylon, and stylistically related to the Tamil tradition of bronze-casting which flourished under the Chola dynasty (11th-13th centuries). It is tentatively dated to the late 13th or early 14th century. The supplement includes several book, bulletin and journal reviews.

Clay in the Hands of Man in India Made for the 'Quick' of Life in Terracotta Images [Editorial]
Anand, Mulk Raj
Vol. 23 No. 1, December 1969, p. 2

Terracotta art in India has been sustained through succeeding generations. The artistic genius is expressed through direct contact between the hands of the artist and the object being produced.

Beauties Born in the Mud of the Potter's Yard: Notes on Old Terracottas
Anand, Mulk Raj
Vol. 23 No. 1, December 1969, pp. 3-12

The writer discusses, with specific examples, the terracotta art the Zhob and Kulli cultures of Baluchistan, Harappan civilization, the Vedic age, and the Maurya, Sunga, Kushana, and Gupta periods.

Portfolio
Vol. 23 No. 1, December 1969, pp. 13-32

Illustrates and describes the terracotta art of Kulli and Zoab, Mohenjodaro and Harappa, proto-historic Rajasthan and Peshawar, and the pre-Mauryan, Mauryan, Sunga, Kushana, Gupta, and early medieval periods.

The Terracotta Art of India
Sankalia, H.D. and Dhavalikar, M.K.
Vol. 23 No. 1, December 1969, pp. 33-54 + 1 unnumbered leaf between pp. 32-33

The article traces the technical advancement of terracotta art through the pre-Harappan, Harappan, post-Harappan, early historical, Mauryan, Sunga, Satavahana, Kushana, Gandhara, Gupta, post-Gupta, and medieval periods. Specific examples from each of these phases are illustrated and described to show the thematic range of the terracottas; although there is a heavy concentration on religious subjects, secular themes such as animals, toys, and scenes of daily life are also frequently met with.