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Volume 21 Number 4, September 1968

Volume 21 Number 4

Pahari Painting

The Pictorial Situation in Pahari Painting
Mulk Raj Anand

Pahari Painting: The Family as the Basis of Style
B.N. Goswamy

1. The Argument

2. The Clue

3. The Family

4. The Style

The Pictorial Situation in Pahari Painting [Editorial]
Anand, Mulk Raj
Vol. 21 No. 4, September 1968, pp. 2-16

Pahari paintings of the 17th and 18th centuries were executed for patrons belonging to the Vaishnava Hindu faith. The editor reviews analyses by art historians and critics of the Basohli, Guler, and Kangra paintings. In the second half of the 17th century, a sophisticated Basohli style developed under the influence of the Mughal school. The style developed at Guler by the carpenter-painter Pandit Seu and his sons Manaku (c. 1710-80/90) and Nainsukh owes its development to the Basohli base. The Guler style of Manaku traveled to Kangra through his son Khushala.

Pahari Painting: The Family as the Basis of Style
Goswamy, B.N.
Vol. 21 No. 4, September 1968, pp. 17-62

The essay reconstructs the genealogy of the Guler family of painters headed by Pandit Seu on the basis of inscriptional evidence. It also traces the development of the painting style of this family through succeeding generations. The style falls into two distinct phases: in the second quarter of the 18th century it followed the Basohli style; from the mid-18th century it proceeded towards the Kangra style. The paintings show Mughal influence. The stages of stylistic development are defined in terms of various miniature sets ascribed to the sons of Pandit Seu (Manaku and Nainsukh) and their descendants. The early and later sets of paintings are stylistically linked, and signed pictures by members of the family are dated up to the second half of the 19th century.